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Comment on: Cardiac fat pat change after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Published:January 02, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2022.12.039
      Obesity is considered a severe public health problem and poses significant challenges due to its high prevalence rates. It is a condition that increases health costs from related diseases, particularly nontransmissible chronic diseases. Among the treatments for obesity, dietary and lifestyle changes are the most frequently used approaches as a first-access treatment. However, such interventions are ineffective in that they frequently do not achieve a 5%–10% reduction in weight at the start of treatment [
      • Pellegrini M.
      • Cioffi I.
      • Evangelista A.
      • et al.
      Effects of time-restricted feeding on body weight and metabolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
      ]. Much attention has been paid to the unsuccessful disease control rates—we seem to be “paddling against the tide.” The cohort study carried out by Fildes et al. [
      • Fildes A.
      • Charlton J.
      • Rudisill C.
      • Littlejohns P.
      • Prevost A.T.
      • Gulliford M.C.
      Probability of an obese person attaining normal body weight: cohort study using electronic health records.
      ] in the United Kingdom, which followed 278,982 participants for 10 years, found that the chance of people with obesity based on a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 of being able to return to “normal” in 1 year is <1%. Most interestingly, just 1 in 12 men and 1 in 10 women can reduce 5% of body weight annually. The successful taxes are inverted proportionally with an increase in BMI. Such results show that the success rate for circumventing this public health problem is minimal. In this sense, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for patients with obesity who meet the criteria established by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). Over the years, several studies have been published demonstrating the benefits of bariatric surgery to achieve success rates for treating obesity. Bariatric surgery is the “gold standard” treatment for weight loss in persons with severe obesity (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) in a short period and with long-term durability [
      • O’Brien P.E.
      Bariatric surgery: mechanisms, indications and outcomes.
      ].
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        Probability of an obese person attaining normal body weight: cohort study using electronic health records.
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        Bariatric surgery: mechanisms, indications and outcomes.
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      Linked Article

      • Cardiac fat pat change after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis
        Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
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          Cardiac fat pad is a metabolically active organ that plays a role in energy homeostasis and cardiovascular diseases and generates inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown remarkable associations between cardiac fat thickness and cardiovascular diseases, making it a valuable target for interventions. Our meta-analysis aimed to investigate the effects of the 2 most popular bariatric surgeries (sleeve gastrectomy [SG] and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB]) in cardiac fat pad reduction. A systematic review of the literature was done by searching in Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane, and PubMed for articles published by September 16, 2022.
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