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Comment on: Patient Perspectives on the Usefulness of the MBSAQIP Bariatric Surgical Risk/Benefit Calculator: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Poppy Addison
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Poppy Addison, Department of Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, 100 East 77th St, New York, NY, 10075,
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, Northwell Health, New York, NY
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Published:January 07, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2023.01.005
      Until the mid-20th century, there was no strict moral or legal obligation to involve patients in medical decision-making. The Hippocratic Corpus even guides physicians to conceal information from the patient; the physician knows best and has the duty to direct medical care

      Faden RR, Beauchamp TL. A History and Theory of Informed Consent. New York: Oxford University Press; 1986.

      . After landmark court cases in the 1950s through 1970s, the doctrine of informed consent established the legal obligation for physicians to obtain consent before performing surgery
      • Bazzano L.A.
      • Durant J.
      • Brantley P.R.
      A Modern History of Informed Consent and the Role of Key Information.
      . Beyond the legal obligation, however, these decisions marked a shift away from paternalistic medicine towards shared decision-making, where physicians work in partnership with patients to align evidence-based medicine with patients’ individual belief systems and goals

      Katz J. The Silent World of Doctor and Patient. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2002.

      . When patients seek out elective surgery, surgeons have a responsibility to discuss the more common complications, more than simply stating the risks are “bleeding, infection, and damage to surrounding structures.”
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      References

      1. Faden RR, Beauchamp TL. A History and Theory of Informed Consent. New York: Oxford University Press; 1986.

        • Bazzano L.A.
        • Durant J.
        • Brantley P.R.
        A Modern History of Informed Consent and the Role of Key Information.
        Ochsner J. 2021; 21: 81-85https://doi.org/10.31486/toj.19.0105
      2. Katz J. The Silent World of Doctor and Patient. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2002.

        • Taddeucci R.J.
        • Madan A.K.
        • Tichansky D.S.
        Band versus bypass: influence of an educational seminar and surgeon visit on patient preference.
        Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2007 Jul-Aug; 3: 452-455

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